Vanilla Ice Cream with Port Wine & Blueberry Reduction

It’s just an innocent pre-weekend treat 😉 This ice cream recipe comes from Michel Roux’s book “Eggs”. I am dairy intolerant and soy ice cream never taste as good as the “real” ones! So, I thought I’ll adjust this recipe and use lacto-free milk and cream. I don’t have an ice cream machine, but I found a way around that, too. If you make it, you won’t be able to resist licking the crème anglaise. I couldn’t…but then I didn’t try very hard! 😛

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Ingredients:

  • 500 ml (17 oz) milk (don’t go lower than 2% fat)
  • 100 ml (3.4 oz) double cream or whipping cream
  • 6 egg yolks
  • 1 vanilla pod, split length-ways
  • 125 fine sugar (I added fine raw cane sugar)

Method:

Split the vanilla pod and scrape out the seeds. In a saucepan bring to the boil milk, ⅔ of the sugar, vanilla beans and the pod. Separate the egg yolks and whisk with the remaining sugar until you achieve a consistency of a runny crème. After removing the vanilla pod, slowly pour the sweet milk mixture into the eggs, continually whisking. Return to the saucepan and cook over a low heat, stirring with a wooden spoon until the crème anglainse lightly coats the back of the spoon. It should leave a clear trace when you run your finger across it. Don’t over-cook it or the mixture will churn and split. Transfer to a bowl and allow to chill in the fridge.

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When cold, combine with the cream and pour into freezer-safe container. Place in the freezer for 30 minutes, then take it out and stir to prevent water cristalisation. Repeat this twice more; you will see a difference in consistency (see pictures above). Leave in the freezer until sets completely. I prepared some port wine and blueberry reduction* to serve with it. The sharp flavours of wine and berries help cut through the sweetness of the ice cream.

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* Blitz ⅓ cup red port wine, ⅓ cup blueberries, 1 tablespoon of sugar and a squirt of lemon in a food processor. Strain and boil in a saucepan over a medium heat until it thickens to a light syrup.

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